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This is the image of the full or partial text of an article entitled "College at Creal Springs Closed Its Doors in 1916", printed in the Alton Evening Telegraph of 1957-01-24. 

Text:

ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH

PAGE ELEVEN

Lasted 32 Years

College at Creal Springs Closed Its Doors in 1916

L,rpnf, body of frnrTftion.

One sucb 'school that came, nourished for n time and then von;«hed, was 31 Creal Springs, soulh and east of Marion In Wll-

eC the collegiate department of Mount Carro) Seminary at Mt. Carol I, 11!., 'from which she was graduated in 1875, After attending these schools, she taught, in

liamson County. This village had ■; country schools, in the high

ment. Thus it will join a host, of j of her academies and colleges

By JOHN W. AM..KN Southern Illinois University

Shurlleff Colic, gb at Alton, j jhat have passed on in Southern krown as the oldest inslltmion J inin0w nr learning in tho state above ' . t ,

1 he 1»>vp1 or the grad* school.! tn ”,p"’ <ln-v ,hw at*

will close its doors ill the eml! rtiintorous stm)?iits.

of the current srhool year. ac-im-tcd much mnueii/e over flic cording to a recent; a not incc*; region nhout them and Ir-ft a

already become widely known; as a heallh resort, a place where many came fo drink the waters of the numerous mineral springs found there or to take mineral water baths, Oval Springs also

school at Frankfort, and in Ewing College before beginning her 32 years of service at the school she was so instrumental in establishing at. Creal Springs.

Th* * lory of this college and

wns widely known as a place;of Mrs. Murrah s part in it Is

where. church gatherings and! well outlined in ‘‘Horse and Bug-OAIL reunion* were held. I £y Days’*, a booklet published

rtamwd Olrls School • by her son, Charles M. Murrah. It was ig this town lhal Henry! in 1037. From it. wc learn that Clay Murrah and his wife. Grace; in March, 1884, they acquired Brown Murrah. moved shortly | title to a five-acre tract, of land after Mkm- m.trriagc in IftSO. I in the village "to be used for Both liar? received college train- j srhool purposes,” The construe-1 inti and hurl hepn teachers. It. 11 on of the. main building — a was not nnnahir.il, therefore, j hnsement and three stories plus I Ini they <hniil(M.ieeome interest-1 attic stnidure — was begun od in education, so marh so I immediately. It wa& completed • that they decided to establish j and ready lor use on Sept. 22, a girls’ school undn the direc-jt$84, when the first term began, tion of Mrs. Murrah. Taught College Courses

Grace Brown was born near i The school had been planned the village of Bainhridge, once; as one for girls. On the first

putting ir her spare moments.1 ies.

decorate the walls of her homej Financial Problems /'rose with paintings made by her own j /There were literary societies, brush.1* j school papers, varied social ac-j

> usic courses "followed the | livlties and above all the an- i methods of the Conservatory of mm) commencement and mm-j Music in Brussels, Belgium.” j ion. Programs of an annual com-a department of theology ww>j mencement and of the "Krica” maintained. In order to be ad- society list a wide range of or milted an applicant was required brings. Among them are decla-lo furnish a “ceriificte to this mations, orations, original poems, character” from the ^church IVOta' solos, duns, ;rlos, and quar-where ho held membership. Heines, pinno solo and duets,^ re-must also have received a ,B-o«II I and a harp duel. Com-

to gospel ministry1 and must I nioncernrnl week whs a truly demonstrate "intellectual fit- 1 great one. ness*1, This course extended ov-j With pissing years financial

er three years during which the student might pastor churches if it did not interfere with his stud-

problem s came 1.0 hescl t h e srhool. These reached such proportions I hat the Inst iluijnn was

forced to close. The last students departed on Christmas | Eve. 1916, and the doors of the[ strange appearing thrce-story frame building were locked, not to* open again for srhool use, Mr. and Mrs. Murrah went to iivr fn a nearby cottage, Mrs. Murrah lived on until 1929, never ceasing her effort to reopen the school to which she had given so many years of unselfish | service. The building stood until when it was dismantled.

I No memorial remains to mark * thr siP of the Creal Springs Col-jle^e and Conservatory of Music.

’ A tood exposition has been I [scheduled by FctropoUs, Brazil. [ ) for early >5)7)7.

t»je county seal of Williamson County, about four miles west of Marion, She attended the Brownsville country schol, fat-

morning. however, as many boys as girls appeared, three of each. It was I here fore decided to make it coeducational. Students con-

(•1 go'uLr to Southern Illinois ‘ tinned to arrive throughout the Normal nr Carnondnh, to the 'term, and before the *nd of the Stau« institute a Klora. and to j first 12 weeks, 59 students had Vising College. She also attend- been enrolled. Twelve of these

were nn the collegiate level, whatever that may have meant. Thirty-one were in the preparatory department, seven in the primary and nine were special students of music.

The first faculty of the Creal I Springs Academy consisted ol | six members. If. C. Murrah.

1 who also did some teaching, was ^ lifted as proprietor and Grace B. Mum.h f-s principal, which oft ice she continued to occupy until the school closed hi 1916.

I he name of Creal Springs Academy was continued until 1894 when it was changed to Creal Springs College and Conservatory ol Music. By this time the number on the faculty ha.1 grown j to 15 and the student enrollment \ to almost. 100. Baccalaureate de-j grees were granted in the ‘class-icar, “Latin - Scientific” and

ri

•'Philosophical*1 fields. An addi-tional year could provide a master’s degree. It had grown into ’ a respected school.

• The curriculum otfered was varied. It was boasted that the college offered one of the most thorough courses in history, three

years of genera! history preeed-j eu by one year of American history, T. O, Hawkins taught “muscular penmanship*' that would eliminate the "cramp-cd and tiresome finger movements**. In addition to the com-I mon branches of learning, the school offered JLatin, Greek, Ger-' man, French, analytical geometry. calculus, typewriting, elocu :icn, shorthand, physical culture, pedagogical studies, music and ail,

• j The beauty of the region as

one in which an artist might 1 1 well work was emphasized and ! it was said, “Any girl can, by

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